1. What is MAFC?

    MAFC is a government linked corporation (GLC) involved in food supply chain management and distribution system of fresh fruits and vegetables to the customers.

    Fully commercial in nature, MAFC is set up to support Malaysia’s agriculture and food supply chain sector;  act as a catalyst for improved agriculture production; and create value at every level of food supply chain.


  2. What is a Supply Chain Management?

    A supply chain is a group of business activities that are linked together for mutual benefit to supply products to customers. Within the horticulture sector the supply chain links the "farm gate to the retail gate".

    In the case of MAFC, our extended supply chain management involves much more than simply the logistics of moving product along the chain. Our core competency is the development and application of food integrity solutions     and management systems to the production, supply, and delivery of fresh, safe fruits and vegetables for the customers involving:

    eating quality
    external appearance
    food safety
    integrity and traceability
    in-store handling, presentation, consumer behaviour
    Inventory management, volumes, storage conditions
    Transport logistics, supply chain relationships, e-commerce
    Sorting, packing, postharvest treatments
    Harvest management and logistics
    Production practices
    Choice of variety, growing location

    Together these aspects of the supply chain we aim to drive consumer satisfaction and industry profitability.


  3. Why was MAFC established?

    Under the 9th Malaysia Plan, the Government had envisioned a revitalization of the     agriculture sector as a potential and sustainable pillar of economic growth. MAFC was set up with the specific aim to set new standards and directions in Malaysia’s food supply chain systems. The focus is to transform the horticultural food sector into a modern, viable and dynamic venture and to enhance Malaysia’s global competitiveness as a regional leader in the production, packaging, branding and distribution of agricultural products.


  4. What are the Vision and Mission of MAFC?

    Our Vision is to be known and trusted throughout the world for cutting edge production, supply and delivery of top quality agrifood.

    Our Mission is to catalyze the transformation of the nation’s agrifood industry by restructuring the supply chain system in line with global standards of safety, quality and sustainability.

    It means, MAFC is focused on reforming the food supply chain system by catalyzing the production of fresh produce and integrating the various components based on the ‘farm to fork’ principle. In other words MAFC’s role is to provide a way to link and integrate the nation’s horticulture activities from growing and environmental management to postharvest practices and marketing communications in order to ensure efficient delivery of safe and quality food to the customers anytime, anywhere. This provides an opportunity for MAFC to deliver a true "value-adding" function by employing the use of cutting-edge technologies and innovations to optimize operative efficiency across the entire food supply chain.


  5. How different then is MAFC from other Government Agencies e.g. FAMA?

    Unlike any other government bodies MAFC is a commercially-driven business. As a commercial entity our objective is to deliver superior shareholder returns by pursuing profitable growth.


  6. Is MAFC competing with wholesalers?

    MAFC has been created to support Malaysia’s agriculture and food supply chain sector through collaborative means to help ensure that the industry is well positioned to succeed in key markets. First and foremost, we believe in fostering long term partnerships with the growers and only work with farmers who subscribe to Good Agricultural Practices (GAP). We should therefore not be viewed as a competitor but rather as a catalyst for improved agricultural production and distribution such as in product quality, type, variety, packaging, grading and pricing.


  7. How does MAFC add value to the Malaysian food supply chain?

    In addition to sourcing the highest quality fresh produce MAFC also integrates value adding ‘farm gate to retail gate’ services every step of the way to ensure reliable and timely delivery of safe and quality products to the customers.

    Our investment in building facilities such as Consolidation, Processing and Packaging     Centres (CPPC), Collection Centres (CC) and Distribution Centres (DC) at strategic     locations around the country provides us with the competitive edge to efficiently handle event the highest level of midstream management of perishable foods that pass through our supply chain custody.

    Our processing activities range from basic grading and sorting of fresh produce to packaging and labeling. They also operate in compliance with global best practices in food safety standards which include HACCP and GMP.

    MAFC also owns 75% stake in a cold logistics and warehousing company, Cold Chain Network Sdn Bhd (CCN) that offers end to end logistics services to meet the diverse requirements of customers from large hypermarkets to the smaller food service operators. This unbroken cold chain service is crucial in view of our tropical environment which could affect the quality of fresh produce.


  8. There seems to be some overlapping of functions as in encouraging the use of hi-tech farming methods and knowledge transfer to farmers? Would these be the role of MAFC or the Ministry of Agriculture?

    At present there is a certain overlap of roles and responsibilities as we support several government initiatives in achieving the common goal of pursuing excellence in the development and management of Malaysian agri-businesses.

    However this will change as we further streamline our responsibilities such as educating the farmers on productivity. A point to note, MAFC is a commercial entity with a social outcome. Our objective is still to pursue profitable growth and ensure a sustainable balance between people, planet and performance (profit).


  9. Tell us about food safety. Why is it so important in today’s environment?

    Food safety is important to ensure that individuals are taking in a balanced amount of     nutrition to ensure vitality of health. Today’s challenging environment drives home the     point that we need better nutrition to cope with the exacting demands of our lifestyle.


  10. Why did MAFC decide to prioritize food safety as one of its principles?

    At MAFC, we believe that food safety should be the cornerstone of our business principles primarily because we are in the agriculture industry. Food safety affects the community we live in –, so through our products and services, we are responsible for its wellbeing.


  11. By whose / what measure would you gauge the food safety quality against? How do these practices apply to / affect the Malaysian consumers?

    We go beyond Good Agriculture Practice (GAP) not just in food production, but also in the entire food supply value chain, from downstream to upstream operations. To this end, we are exploring ways to implement SALM and GLOBALGAP measures in our daily operations to ensure consistency in the quality of our deliverables.


  12. Why is MAFC engaged in high-tech greenhouse farming?

    In order to achieve a competitive model MAFC has to invest in new technology to establish the proof of concept.  MAFC needs a model that is financially viable in order to attract new     investments from other capital institutions. With the low availability of remaining land suitable for agriculture, new investment on the highlands is difficult. Therefore, the transformation exercise involving eco-friendly, high investment but high productivity agricultural activities needs to be implemented in Cameron Highlands as a showcase.

  13. Testing MAFC FAQ?

    In order to achieve a competitive model MAFC has to invest in new technology to establish the proof of concept.  MAFC needs a model that is financially viable in order to attract new     investments from other capital institutions. With the low availability of remaining land suitable for agriculture, new investment on the highlands is difficult. Therefore, the transformation exercise involving eco-friendly, high investment but high productivity agricultural activities needs to be implemented in Cameron Highlands as a showcase.

 

 

 

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